MOBILITY AND TRANSPORT
European Road Safety Charter
good practice

Good practice submission

Good practice submission

What problem did you address/are you addressing? 
There was a lack of clear information about where crashes were happening on the roads in the UK which led to conflict between authorities who were responsible for safety, and members of the public who wanted new interventions on their local roads. By allowing the public free access to millions of records CrashMap has informed UK road safety debates, both in the media and in communities. Rather than requesting paper copies of reports from councils, members of the public can now gain instant access to the data they need. Academic institutions and commercial developers have also been helped.Until the launch of CrashMap in September 2011 there was no national, searchable map of all collisions on Great Britain’s roads. Without access to this vital data source community leaders, concerned parents and parish councils have struggled to understand the impact of reported traffic crashes on their local roads, or indeed, what they can do about it. CrashMap has become the definitive source of mapped collision data in the UK and receives over 100,000 visitors per year.
List the actions you carried/are carrying out 
Date 
Thursday, 1 September, 2011
Name of action 

The main activity is the website itself.  It was created by the company using its own funds with support from the UK Department for Transport who supply the data.  Access to a fully searchable map of the collision data, with filters for collision types and date ranges, is provided free of charge to everyone. Detailed reports can then be readily accessed for a small click charge (less that £1GBP per report) to any interested parties.  Free access to detailed reports is provided to charities, campaign groups, and local councils.
The map is used as a source of information for journalists and Campsall Owen have provided a high level of support to help them understand the data when using it to address stories in the news.
The development of CrashMap has created a platform for further projects that assist in accessing and utilizing road casualty data for public benefit, including RiskMap which analyses crash density along routes, and SpeedMap which uses some of the information to identify maximum speeds on roads.

How did you disseminate/are you disseminating results or how did you promote/are you promoting your initiative? 
The project has already received a lot of attention nationally, featuring on national websites and it is regularly quoted in local newspapers. Local journalists now recognise CrashMap as the definitive source of data about collisions on local roads and use it as evidence in news stories. Several local authorities have adopted CrashMap for use on their own websites e.g. www.saferroads.org/my-roads CrashMap has become part of the toolkit used by academic institutions and commercial training providers to develop professional understanding around the uses of road casualty data.Dissemination was further helped when CrashMap was awarded a Prince Michael award in 2013.
How did you evaluate/are you evaluating the success of your action? 
In 2015 CrashMap received over 150,000 page views per year and has 13,000 registered users. Current search numbers exceed 480,000 over the lifetime of the project. This shows that the resource is well used with thousands of users coming back again and again. In Shropshire the maps have been used by local campaign groups to put their case for lower speed limits in certain places; CrashMap is also promoted by campaign group 20’s Plenty as a tool for communities examining the case for 20mph limits.