MOBILITY AND TRANSPORT
European Road Safety Charter
good practice

Good practice submission

Good practice submission

What problem did you address/are you addressing? 
A disproportionate number of crashes involve a driver under 25 – 1-in-5 crash in the first six months they’re on the road and 95% of those crashes are down to attitude to risk. Our research shows that 88% don’t have the DVSA-recommended number of driving lessons and 44% have less than half the recommended hours of private practice. The part of the brain that deals with risk and consequence planning (the frontal cortex) is not fully developed until around the age of 25, presenting a serious problem – young drivers are at risk from peer pressure, competitive driving and distracted driving.
What are your objectives? 
ingenie uses telematics technology (a small device fitted in customers’ cars) to incentivise safer driving, providing education and support to young drivers who need it. With ingenie, if you drive well, you pay less.
Our product is built to keep young drivers engaged, giving us the opportunity to continue educating.
List the actions you carried/are carrying out 
Date 
Thursday, 1 September, 2011
Name of action 

The high cost of insurance for this age group led to us choosing discounts as a way to lower prices and incentivise safe driving.
Using data to give feedback on driver behaviour
As a black box insurer, we have access to 500million miles of driving data. Telematics offers such an insight into how young drivers really behave that we consider it our moral responsibility to use that wealth of data to help them.
We developed a system for sending customers feedback on their driving. The messages are short and easy to understand at a glance, giving advice for the four key areas we collect data on: speed, acceleration, braking and cornering.
We built our feedback system with advice from driver behaviour experts, to make sure it would resonate with young drivers. The messages are delivered through an app with push notifications, so it’s a natural action for a young person to engage in.
Driving engagement for improved safety
Since creating an email campaign that reminds drivers of the benefits of checking their feedback, we’ve seen engagement rise to 97%. Our data shows that drivers who check their feedback just twice a month are 42% less likely to crash than those who don’t check at all, so engagement is vital.
The Driver Behaviour Unit (DBU) and continued education
We also use our feedback system to indentify drivers who need extra support: if they show behaviour that’s cause for concern, the DBU gets in touch. They contact the 5% of the ingenie community that drives recklessly and use a psychological model for behaviour change to help them understand the problem (using their driving data for context) and make steps to improve.
This activity is supported by regular content published in the Young Driver’s Guide, covering everything from how to maintain your car to road safety legislation and driving tips. This area of ingenie.com has seen a huge growth in popularity over the last year, meaning more young drivers than ever are finding the information they need.
Our app also gives drivers quick access to content created just for them, explaining how they can work on their driving skills and improve their driving score – lowering their risk of a crash and increasing their chance of earning a discount. 
Supporting government road safety initiatives
For some years, the UK government was considering Graduated Driver Licensing, which would have put new restrictions on young drivers, such as night-time curfews and passenge limits. Telematics as a private sector initiative has had such a positive impact that it has gone some way to replacing GDL, without restricting the freedom of young drivers – and without causing a lot of resentment and pressure on police.
The new road saftey minister, Andrew Jones, has recently released his first road safety statement, which declares support for telematics. ingenie has provided insight into young drivers on many occasions, including parliamentary discussions of telematics insurance, and continues to share its findings with the government.
Getting parents more involved
Parental involvement has a massive impact on a young driver’s future and telematics facilitates that, opening up a conversation on the trends in driving behaviour. Staying involved beyond paying for insurance results in a 28% lower crash frequency when parents see their child’s feedback.
We launched the Parent’s Guide on ingenie.com after great success with our Young Driver’s Guide. We wanted to help parents understand that they’re not there to teach their child and their input should be more than just writing cheques. Learning to drive should be a collaboration between the student, the instructor and the parents, and that’s a relationship we actively encourage in our marketing and road safety efforts. 

How did you disseminate/are you disseminating results or how did you promote/are you promoting your initiative? 
ingenie’s approach has been the subject of many articles in motoring magazines, driving instructor association publications and insurance industry reports. It has also been covered in insurance industry reports, and received excellent feedback when we won the Prince Michael Road Safety Award in 2013. We engage young people through social media campaigns, partnering with driving schools and the Driving Instructor Association, speaking at events like FirstCar magazine’s Young Driver Focus, and publishing our Young Driver Report to share our findings. We also see many of our drivers sharing their ingenie feedback on social media – driving safely is finally becoming cool.
How did you evaluate/are you evaluating the success of your action? 
We have reduced crashes in our community by 40% compared with the national averages for the age group. Our DBU reports that 90% of risky drivers improve their behaviour within a month of contact, proving that even people who show reckless behaviour can be coached to drive safely. 97% of our community engage with their driving feedback, checking it an average of 14 times a month.A few things we monitor include: How does checking driving feedback relate to crash frequency?How is driving score linked to crash frequency? How does driving change after a discount?How many earn good driving discounts? (Currently 70%)